The AiR Blog

 

You Oughta Be Ashamed of Yourself!

Positive reinforcement, as basic and childlike as that sounds, is a motivating force for progress. Speaking to someone’s goodness despite their wrong choices unlocks their worth. “You’re not a bad person, you’re just headed in a bad direction.” Or maybe “You shouldn’t be ashamed of yourself, maybe just aware of faulty patterns so you can choose different ones.” That’s a great way to start motivating someone. Versus, “I told you so, you ought to be ashamed of yourself.”

By | March 23rd, 2017|Self-Care|

You Are a Reward

You might be grumbling. You might be accusing, guilting or complaining. Or trying desperately to prevent them from going out. You might be brooding in a cold silence. This might be hard to believe, but your presence and your conversation, however negative, are something your loved one counts on, and expects from you.

By | March 7th, 2017|CRAFT, Rewards|

What I Did to Get Better

If I'm out at a party at a friend's house, staying present in the party, in the moment, and enjoying every single moment with them, because that's where I'm at right now ... [this] helped me to have some joy and love right then, in that moment ...

By | March 7th, 2017|CRAFT, Self-Care|

Who Should Pay for Sober Housing?

Treatment doesn’t see its role as helping the newly sober person to manage financially. They rarely ask the question, "So where is the job?” ... “How is this person going to pay for the sober house?” ... “How is this person going to get to their appointments?” They certainly don’t see their role as providing inpatient treatment until such time as the person is financially stable.

By | January 31st, 2017|Addiction Treatment Centers, Aftercare, Recovery|

What Happens if Sober Housing Doesn’t Work Out?

In order to start anew with the process of sobriety, a resident who has relapsed should be sent to a more intensive level of treatment (for example: clinical stabilization services or CSS in Massachusetts), but too often nothing is available and the only option is detox. Here is some useful information for pursuing the next level of treatment.

If You’ve Got Pen & Paper, You’ve Got Power

A number of studies have shown that writing regularly in a journal can improve both mental and physical health. The best way to care for your loved one is to care for yourself, and devoting time to writing and self-evaluation is a key part of AiR's program. Here are some tips for making the most of the tools offered on our member site.

By | August 17th, 2016|CRAFT, Sanctuary, Self-Care|

Are You Willing to Change?

Our role as the family member of a struggling loved one is not limited to doing things for them. What we do for our own well-being (physical, mental, spiritual ... ) will create a ripple effect that brings relief and much needed change, within us and all around us.

By | March 13th, 2015|Communication, CRAFT, Self-Care|

Can You Practice Letting Go of Shame?

Shame is a human emotion, meaning we all experience it. It has even been suggested that it is the most primitive of all emotions, dating back to our origins as humans. Shame, however, is toxic in large amounts, and many of us find ourselves stuck in that leaky boat. Understanding how shame works is the first step in preparing to conquer it.

By | February 24th, 2015|Communication, Self-Care|